Fathers and Sports, Dad Jokes Galore, Marwin Gonzalez is a Dad Too!

Knowledge Drop June 17, 2018 – Big Papi Edition* (#36)

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*While there were several players named “Pop” in Major League history, we were not inspired to highlight Pop Swett, Pop-Boy Smith, or Pop Rising, we went with good old “Big Papi” for Father’s Day today.  All our love to the Dads out there. Thanks for always going to our games and not telling us how much we actually sucked. 


TOP KNOWLEDGE — WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW NOW

DAD JOKE(S) OF THE DAY

In honor of Dad, we are adjusting our menu today. Our Dad Joke of the Day will be first, but we’ve added a few so that this could be the Daddy of All Dad Jokes of the Day.

Why did dad snore like a loud muffler last night?

 

 

 

 

He was exhausted


Which country’s capital is the fastest growing?

 

 

 

 

 

Ireland. Because every year it’s Dublin.


What do midgets and dwarfs have in common?

 

 

 

 

 

Very little.


Did you hear about the restaurant on the moon?

Great food, no atmosphere.


How does a penguin build it’s house?

Igloos it together.


Thanks for Sports, Dad

By Thomas J. McFeeley

Most of us owe our love of baseball or football to our fathers. I’ve been watching the Mets since before my first childhood memory and that’s because of my dad.

While he gets the blame for my love (and hate) of the Mets — we watched together when I was four–  I became a Jets fan because I started watching football closer to age 14, and Dad rooted for the Giants. Not that he watched regularly; in no way would you count him as a fan. Nevertheless, at age 14, the natural thing to do was go the opposite way of your dad.  Fuck the Giants.

Dad got me again.

Seventy-six combined seasons of Mets baseball and Jets football and I have but ONE championship memory. And if it wasn’t for a wild pitch and Bill Buckner, I wouldn’t even have that.

But my deep love of baseball and, by extension, football are rooted in my dad. I’m sure it’s the same for many or most of you.

Who can forget that first moment they stepped out from the concourses of a major league ballpark and truly saw the color green for the first time? You were probably holding your Dad’s hand.

That’s not everybody’s story of course.  It could have been an uncle, a neighbor who was like a dad, a scout leader. It could have been your mom, or the people on your block, or a grandparent. Many didn’t have a dad at home every day. Many more had a dad who was home every day but wasn’t present.

Having no children of my own, and a troubled relationship with my own father, I’ve observed a lot of troubled paths for children – and adults – with their own fathers. Without getting too preachy, we’ve put the wrong emphasis on what it means to be a man. It has nothing to do with tools, cars, muscles, and stoicism. It has everything to do with being present for people who need you, for supporting those who love you, and putting other people first.  It’s created generations of men who have been conflicted, confused and confined in the emotions within their own skin – and fatherhood has become a difficult task.

Soapbox aside, the point is everyone needs more father figures. We need to show more boys, more men, more people, what being a man truly means. The flip side of the coin is that everyone needs more people to love them, to take an interest in them, and to celebrate the  person that they are – not the person we want them to be.

So take a kid to a game. Watch a stupid, weird movie with a teenager who revels in being eccentric. Shake your son’s boyfriend’s hand as firmly as you would his best friend who is on the football team. Be a man. Be a father. Or an additional father. We all need that.

When you talk to your dad today, whether he’s still with us or not, whether you get along with him or not, make a point to thank him for introducing you to baseball, or football, or hockey or wrestling, or curling. If that wasn’t him, thank the person who did. Thank the man who represented a father figure in your life, even if it was for just a summer or for your entire childhood.

Happy Father’s Day to all the Dads, stepdads, grandfathers, uncles, father figures and true men who lead by example, every day of the year.

Thank you, Dad, for introducing me to baseball. It’s taught me discipline, sportsmanship, passion, humility, and what it means to be one part of a larger team.  You got that part right and it’s made all the difference.

Tell us who introduced you to your favorite sport or your sports-related memories of your dad, or father figure.


A THOUSAND WORDS

Today, data scientist Jim Melichar looks at Marwin Gonzalez. To keep with today’s theme, Gonzalez is a father of three children, and one dog

“The difference in Marwin Gonzalez’ batted ball profile between 2017 and 2018 has been his inability to hit the ball back up the middle and to center field with authority. Pull-field metrics are fine, just has worse launch angles and weaker contact to Center.”

Follow Jim on Twitter, @JimMelichar7, and check out his data charts at https://tabsoft.co/2LFSmXZ


RIDDLE ME THIS

A man while looking at a photograph said, “Brothers and sisters have I none. That man’s father is my father’s son.” Who was the person in the photograph?

Email your guess to BigMacFantasySports@gmail.com

Thursday’s Riddle: A man left home running. He ran a ways and then turned left, ran the same distance and turned left again, ran the same distance and turned left again. When he got home, there were two masked men. Who were they?

Two readers, Frank Chambers and George Argentino, guessed correctly that the two men were the catcher and the umpire.

 


WHAT WE ARE WATCHING

Speaking of dad snoring, today we are watching a video of some guy’s dad snoring.

 

 

WHAT WE’RE ALSO WATCHING:

Remember that time Pedro knew who his daddy was?

Pedro: The Yankees Are My Daddy


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